Tag Archives: gemstone of the month

Gemstone of the Month – Carnelian

Carnelian is a brownish red to orange, translucent to opaque variety of chalcedony. Carnelian is probably named after the the kornel cherry because of its colour. It is sometimes known as cornelian.

Carnelian has been used for decorative purposes by humans for thousands of years. Wikipedia tells us: “The bow drill was used to drill holes into carnelian in Mehrgarh between 4th-5th millennium BC. Carnelian was recovered from Bronze Age Minoan layers at Knossos on Crete in a form that demonstrated its use in decorative arts; this use dates to approximately 1800 BC. Carnelian was used widely during Roman times to make engraved gems for signet or seal rings for imprinting a seal with wax on correspondence or other important documents. Hot wax does not stick to carnelian. Sard was used for Assyrian cylinder seals, Egyptian and Phoenician scarabs, and early Greek and Etruscan gems. The Hebrew odem (translated sardius), the first stone in the High Priest’s breastplate, was a red stone, probably sard but perhaps red jasper.”

Carnelian is thought to aid with concentration, and by keeping one focused on the here and now and not on past experiences. Carnelian is believed to be calming and grounding, and  encourages initiative and determination.

Carnelian is understood to improve circulation, aid with problems of the liver, bladder, kidneys and spleen and with male impotency, and to increase appetite. It is believed to help with PMS as well as sexual anxiety.

Carnelian is thought to prevent accidents, and to protect the home from theft, fire and storm damage.

Carnelian is beautiful – the range of colour from reddish brown through to almost yellow is so vibrant!

I have some gorgeous carnelian available in my gemstone collection. If you find a stone that appeals to you and you’d like to have it set in a ring or a pendant, let me know – I’d love to create something beautiful for you.

Gemstone of the Month – Serpentine

Serpentine is the name given to various minerals found in serpentinite rocks. These are used as a source of magnesium and also in industry, and as a decorative stone. The Irish Connemara marble is a form of serpentine.

The name is thought to come from the Latin serpentinus, meaning ‘serpent rock’ – based on the mineral’s greenish color and smooth or scaly appearance.

Serpentine has been used since ancient times to guard against disease and sorcery. It is believed to provide protection against venomous creatures such as snakes and insects. It is thought to balance mood swings, and to promote the ability to solve conflicts peacefully.

Serpentine is beautifully offset by silver I think – it’s my current favourite stone!

Serpentine Rings

I have some serpentine in my gemstone collection. If you find a stone that appeals to you and you’d like to have it set in a ring or a pendant, get in touch – I’d love to create something beautiful for you.

Puddingstone

Puddingstone

Puddingstone (photo credit Andrea Jaeger Miehls)

Puddingstone is the popular name for an agate conglomerate, so called because of the plum pudding-like appearance of the rounded pebbles whose colours contrast with the matrix which surrounds them.

Puddingstone Slice

Puddingstone Slice (photo credit East Herts Geology Club)

 

There are different types of puddingstone, with different composition, origin, and geographical distribution. Examples of different types of puddingstones include the Hertfordshire, Schunemunk, Roxbury and St. Joseph Island puddingstones.

Puddingstone St Mary's Chesham

Remains of a stone circle of pudding stone incorporated into the structure of St Mary’s Church, Chesham, Buckinghamshire (Photo credit Iridescent)

Puddingstone has been used since at least Roman times as a building material, and also for grinding corn shaped into a device called a quern.

Puddingstone Quern

Puddingstone Quern (Photo credit St Albans Museums)

Puddingstone is believed to be useful in assisting with anxiety or stress.

Large Puddingstone

Large Puddingstone (photo credit DI Showshoe)

Puddingstone is used to prevent tissue deterioration of internal organs and muscles, to strengthen immune system and to promote body balance. It is supposed to help alleviate any pain or disorder.

Puddingstone Sphere

Puddinstone Sphere (Phot0 credit The Rock Shed)

This gorgeous Puddingstone cabochon, which comes from Agate Creek right here in Queensland, Australia, was snapped up by a lovely client of mine.

Puddingstone Cab

I made this ring for her.

Puddingstone and Sterling Silver Ring

Contact me if you’d like me to create a custom piece for you!

Rhyolite

Rhyolite - Closeup (photo credit Outback Mining)

Rhyolite – Closeup (photo credit Outback Mining)

Rhyolite is a volcanic rock, and is known as the volcanic equivalent of granite. It is sometimes known as Rainforest Jasper. Its occurrence is quite widespread throughout the world.

Flow-banded Rhyolite (photo credit Angela Walker)

Flow-banded Rhyolite (photo credit Angela Walker)

Pre-historic quarries of rhyolite have been discovered in the location of east Pennsylvania, USA. Rhyolite was given its name by the German traveller and geologist Ferdinand von Richthofen after his explorations in the Rocky Mountains in the 1860s.

Rhyolite - Slab (photo credit GemrockAuctions)

Rhyolite – Slab (photo credit GemrockAuctions)

Rhyolite is supposed to spark creativity in individuals who are ready to move forward and make things happen in their life. It apparently helps to break through the mental barriers.

Rhyolite - Polished Stone (photo credit GreenEarthStones)

Rhyolite – Polished Stone (photo credit GreenEarthStones)

This stone is used for meditation, progression in life, focusing on the present moment and resolving issues not yet complete.

Rhyolite - Sphere (photo credit Crystalarium)

Rhyolite – Sphere (photo credit Crystalarium)

I have this lovely piece of rhyolite in cab form which I’d be delighted to make into a pendant or ring for you – just contact me and let me know!

Rhyolite 

Strawberry Quartz

Strawberry Quartz Rough (photo credit Promiseintime)

Strawberry Quartz Rough (photo credit Promiseintime)

Strawberry quartz is sagenitic quartz, a transparent colourless quartz containing needlelike crystals, in this case red inclusions of iron oxide.

Strawberry Quartz Pebbles (photo credit Crystal Lovers)

Strawberry Quartz Pebbles (photo credit Crystal Lovers)

The bright color of genuine strawberry quartz is accentuated by small seedlike inclusions of lepidocrocite and haematite. It is most often found in Russia, Kazakhstan, and Brazil.

Strawberry Quartz Point (photo credit Rob Lavinsky)

Strawberry Quartz Point (photo credit Rob Lavinsky)

Strawberry quartz can be soothing and calming.  It apparently enhances intentions of love, gratitude and generosity.

Strawberry Quartz Sphere (photo credit Crystal Cure)

Strawberry Quartz Sphere (photo credit Crystal Cure)

Some people wear Strawberry quartz when trying to attract a soul-mate. Strawberry quartz is thought to assist in bringing balance to the psyche and the emotions.

Strawberry Quartz (photo credit CrystalRocksandGems)

I have a gorgeous little strawberry quartz cabochon available to be made into a ring or pendant – more info on that here.

Strawberry Quartz Cabochon

Gemstone of the Month – Shattuckite

I was so happy when I first discovered shattuckite!  It is the most amazing gemstone, which comes in all manner of combinations of blue.

Shattuckite is a mix of azurite, chrysocolla, malachite, and sometimes copper (cuperite) in quartz. It was first discovered in 1915 in the copper mines of Bisbee, Arizona, specifically the Shattuck Mine (hence the name).

It is a psuedomorph, meaning that it forms as the result of an atom by atom change to a crystal structure, in this case of Malachite.

Shattuckite is reputed to assist with reconciliation and renewal. Shattuckite is also used to channel information. It is said to calm the mind and create harmony.

Shattuckite is believed to be helpful in healing diabetes, assisting with calcium absorption problems, thyroid issues, mites and other infestations, and tonsillitis. 

Shattuckite and Sterling Silver Pendant

You can have a little piece of this fabulous stone to wear for your very own!

I have some shattuckite in my gemstone collection. If you find a stone that appeals to you and you’d like to have it set in a ring or a pendant, let me know.