Tag Archives: custom jewellery

Eudialyte and Sterling Silver Cuff Bangle

Eudialyte Cuff Bangle

Vera came to my workshop and browsed through my gemstone collection, choosing two eudialyte stones for me to create with – one for her, and one for her partner.

Eudialyte and Sterling Silver Cuff Bangle

This cuff is for Vera. She wanted some subtle detail if I thought it would suit the stone.

Eudialyte and Sterling Silver Cuff Bangle

Vera was very happy with the end result, and so was I!

Turquoise and Chrysocolla Sterling Silver Cuff Bangle

Turquoise and Chrysocolla Cuff Bangle

This cuff bracelet was a one-off remodelling job I did for a lovely client using an old cuff which was precious to her but unfortunately broken. It’s a good reminder to be careful when putting on your cuff bangles not to squeeze or stretch them and over-stress the metal!

Turquoise and Chrysocolla Sterling Silver Cuff Bangle

The existing stones were (probably) turquoise, and the addition of chrysocolla adds interest and texture to the piece.

Turquoise and Chrysocolla Sterling Silver Cuff Bangle

It was great working with Juliet, and we discovered quite a few uncanny coincidences that made the experience even more special! Thanks!

Peugeot Sterling Silver Lion Rampant Cuff Links

Peugeot Lion Rampant Cuff Links

I created these custom sterling silver Peugeot cufflinks for a client for her husband.

Peugeot Sterling Silver Lion Rampant Cuff Links

I sawed the lion rampant by hand with my jeweller’s saw – I cherish my tools!

Peugeot Sterling Silver Lion Rampant Cuff Links

Sterling Silver Condamine Bell

Condamine Bell

The Condamine Campdraft Assocation commissioned me to create a custom Condamine bell pendant for their Ladies Draft winner. These bells were traditionally made out of old worn-out sawblades and were worn by cattle. You can read a little more more about them here.

Sterling Silver Condamine Bell

Yes, it even has a clapper!

Sterling Silver Condamine Bell

Threepenny Cuff Links

Threepenny Cuff Links

A client came to me with two old bracelets made from old threepenny bits. They ranged in date from 1897 to 1940. The bracelets had seen better days, and my client asked if I could take two of the 1917 coins off and create cuff links as a gift for her husband.

Threepenny Cuff Links

It was slightly daunting to be working with 100 year old coins, but the cuff links turned out ok!

Threepenny Cuff Links

Gemstone of the Month – Carnelian

Carnelian is a brownish red to orange, translucent to opaque variety of chalcedony. Carnelian is probably named after the the kornel cherry because of its colour. It is sometimes known as cornelian.

Carnelian has been used for decorative purposes by humans for thousands of years. Wikipedia tells us: “The bow drill was used to drill holes into carnelian in Mehrgarh between 4th-5th millennium BC. Carnelian was recovered from Bronze Age Minoan layers at Knossos on Crete in a form that demonstrated its use in decorative arts; this use dates to approximately 1800 BC. Carnelian was used widely during Roman times to make engraved gems for signet or seal rings for imprinting a seal with wax on correspondence or other important documents. Hot wax does not stick to carnelian. Sard was used for Assyrian cylinder seals, Egyptian and Phoenician scarabs, and early Greek and Etruscan gems. The Hebrew odem (translated sardius), the first stone in the High Priest’s breastplate, was a red stone, probably sard but perhaps red jasper.”

Carnelian is thought to aid with concentration, and by keeping one focused on the here and now and not on past experiences. Carnelian is believed to be calming and grounding, and  encourages initiative and determination.

Carnelian is understood to improve circulation, aid with problems of the liver, bladder, kidneys and spleen and with male impotency, and to increase appetite. It is believed to help with PMS as well as sexual anxiety.

Carnelian is thought to prevent accidents, and to protect the home from theft, fire and storm damage.

Carnelian is beautiful – the range of colour from reddish brown through to almost yellow is so vibrant!

I have some gorgeous carnelian available in my gemstone collection. If you find a stone that appeals to you and you’d like to have it set in a ring or a pendant, let me know – I’d love to create something beautiful for you.

Gemstone of the Month – Serpentine

Serpentine is the name given to various minerals found in serpentinite rocks. These are used as a source of magnesium and also in industry, and as a decorative stone. The Irish Connemara marble is a form of serpentine.

The name is thought to come from the Latin serpentinus, meaning ‘serpent rock’ – based on the mineral’s greenish color and smooth or scaly appearance.

Serpentine has been used since ancient times to guard against disease and sorcery. It is believed to provide protection against venomous creatures such as snakes and insects. It is thought to balance mood swings, and to promote the ability to solve conflicts peacefully.

Serpentine is beautifully offset by silver I think – it’s my current favourite stone!

Serpentine Rings

I have some serpentine in my gemstone collection. If you find a stone that appeals to you and you’d like to have it set in a ring or a pendant, get in touch – I’d love to create something beautiful for you.

ADF Major's Cufflinks

Australian Army Major’s Cufflinks

ADF Major's Cufflinks

I had a request from a client to turn her husband’s Australian Army major’s crowns into a set of cuff links as a surprise for him.

ADF Major's Cufflinks

After a quick refresher to make sure that the melting point of the metal would not be too low to take the soldering, I removed the existing toggles, soldered cuff link backs on the crowns, et voila! (OK, I confess I had to change the direction of the links after a little misunderstanding, but hey – cuff links achieved!)

Lapis Lazuli

(image credit Ra'ike)

(image credit Ra’ike)

Lapis Lazuli has been mined in Afghanistan for over 6,000 years.

(image credit Philippe Giabbanelli)

(image credit Philippe Giabbanelli)

Lapis is the Latin word for ‘stone’, and lazuli comes from the Latin ‘lazulum’ which was derived the name of the stone in Persian. The name of the stone came to be associated with its color – the word azure comes from lapis lazuli.

(image credit Parent Géry)

(image credit Parent Géry)

Lapis was long ground up to make the pigment ultramarine, which was widely used during the Renaissance in frescoes and oil painting (this method was replaced in the 19th century with a synthetic compound.)

(image credit Walters Art Museum)

(image credit Walters Art Museum)

Because of its amazing blue colouring, Lapis has been prized; carved and worn throughout antiquity, in pieces like this Roman Imperial Eagle. I saw quite a lot of it in precious pieces in museums while travelling in Egypt.

Large Lapis Lazuli Cabochon

Lapis is believed to be good for communications and good judgement, for enhancing memory, and to attract success.

Lapis Lazuli Cabochon Pair

Lapis is gorgeous – and I have these pieces in my gemstone collection just waiting to be made into something fabulous!

Mookaite

(photo credit Outback Mining)

(photo credit Outback Mining)

Mookaite is a type of silicified porcelanite, which forms in silt-stone from the lower Cretaceous period that is found over much of the Carnarvon Basin in Western Australia.

(photo credit Michelle Pemberton)

(photo credit Michelle Pemberton)

The name Mookaite is derived from Mooka Creek, where the rock is mined. According to locals, the Aboriginal word “mooka” means “running waters”.

(photo credit Creative Crystals)

(photo credit Creative Crystals)

Mookaite is believed to be a healing stone that bestows strength. It is said to shield the wearer from difficult situations and to connect us to loved ones who have passed away. It is thought to assist with assessing problems and making decisions. Mookaite is used to treat glandular or stomach disorders, hernias, ruptures and water retention.

Mookaite Cabochon

Mookaite comes in many lovely colourways. I have these pieces in my gemstone collection just waiting to be made into something fabulous!

Pale Mookaite Cabochon

Haematite

Hematite with Quartz (photo credit Rob Lavinsky)

Hematite with Quartz (photo credit Rob Lavinsky)

Haematite is the mineral form of an iron oxide. It can be black to steel or silver-gray; brown to reddish brown; or red. It is mined as the main ore of iron.

BotryoidalHaematite (photo credit Harvard Museum of Natural History)

BotryoidalHaematite (photo credit Harvard Museum of Natural History)

Gray hematite is typically found in places where there has been standing water or mineral hot springs. Haematite has also been discovered on Mars!

Haematite on Mars (photo credit NASA)

Haematite on Mars (photo credit NASA)

The name haematite is derived from the Greek word for blood ‘αἷμα haima’ as haematite can be red. It is used by jewellers in powdered form (with grease added) for fine polishing and is called rouge.

Red Haematite (Michigan)

Red Haematite (Michigan)

Haematite is believed to have grounding properties. It is thought to help reduce the discomfort of leg cramps and broken bones. It is also thought to cleanse the blood, and help with blood-related diseases such as anaemia.

Haematite Sphere (photo credit Manchester Herbs)

Haematite Sphere (photo credit Manchester Herbs)

There are some lovely haematite cabochons in my gemstone collection. If you’d like something beautiful made, let me know!

Huge Haematite Cabochon

 

Labradorite - zdjęcia Stowarzyszenie Spirifer

Gemstone of the Month – Labradorite

Labradorite is a  type of feldspar consisting of between 30-50% Albite and 50-70% Anorthite. It was named after peninsula of Labrador in Canada, where it was first found.

Labradorite shows labradorescence – a schiller effect in lustrous metallic tints, often blue and green, and sometimes the complete spectrum. This effect is also found in moonstone.

Labradorite and Sterling Silver Ring

Labradorite is believed to stimulate imagination, help develop enthusiasm and to see more clearly in meditation. it is thought to assist with disorders of the eyes and brain and to relieve anxiety.

Green Labradorite and Sterling Silver Ring

It is supposed to balance hormones and relieve menstrual tension; and regulate metabolism. Labradorite is used to treat colds, gout, and rheumatism, lower blood pressure, and aid in digestion.

I have some gorgeous labradorite cabochons just waiting to be turned into beautiful jewellery for you – you can find them in my gemstone collectionLet me know what you’d like created!

Labradorite Wedge Cabochon

 

Small Labradorite Oval Cabochons

Sterling SilverAboriginal Symbol Cuff Bracelet

Sterling Silver Aboriginal Symbol Cuff Bracelet

Sterling SilverAboriginal Symbol Cuff Bracelet

I recently created this custom made sterling silver cuff, which depicts an Aboriginal symbol representing travelling (with the circles representing a resting place/watering hole).

Sterling SilverAboriginal Symbol Cuff Bracelet

 

My client was pleased with the rustic branch or sand drawing-like nature I gave the symbol, and he has given it to his friend to remind her of her connection to her home while she goes ‘walkabout’. I really enjoy making meaningful pieces for people!

Sterling SilverAboriginal Symbol Cuff Bracelet

Chrysocolla

Chrysocolla  (photo credit MinDat)

Chrysocolla (photo credit MinDat)

 

According to Wikipedia, Chrysocolla is a hydrated copper cyclosilicate mineral with the formula (Cu,Al)2H2Si2O5(OH)4·nH2O. Hehehe, such a convoluted scientific string! I guess that just means it’s a compound, which is apparent from the many wonderful blue/green colourways that can be seen in various pieces.

 

Chrysocolla  (photo credit Great Rough)

Chrysocolla (photo credit Great Rough)

 

Chrysocolla is a minor ore of copper, and like malachite, has a high copper content, which is what gives it that fabulous blue/green colouring.

 

Chrysocolla - Botryoidal (photo credit MinDat)

Chrysocolla – Botryoidal (photo credit MinDat)

 

The name Chrysocolla derives from the Greek chrysos (gold) and kolla (glue), referring to its use as a flux in soldering gold. The term has been used since antiquity.

 

Chrysocolla Stalagtite  (photo credit MinDat)

Chrysocolla Stalagtite (photo credit MinDat)

 

It is believed to have a calming influence, and also to attract love. It is supposed to help heal burns, fever, and detoxify the liver.

 

Chrysocolla  (photo credit Mineral Miners)

Chrysocolla (photo credit Mineral Miners)

 

I have some lovely chrysocolla cabochons just waiting to be turned into beautiful jewellery for you – you can find them in my gemstone collectionLet me know what you’d like created!

 

Chrysocolla Cabochon

Sky Sun Sea Hessonite Garnet and Sterling Silver Pendant

Sky, Sun, Sea – Hessonite Garnet and Sterling Silver Pendant

My lovely sister Chris, who lives far away in London, inspired me to head in a new direction as we were discussing the creation of a custom made piece for her to wear. Overlay is a great technique as it gives depth and texture to the piece. I’ve been thinking of creating some pieces like this for a while, and Chris gave me the inspiration to start!

Sky Sun Sea Hessonite Garnet and Sterling Silver Pendant

The theme of the sea resonates with Chris, as she has worked extensively with organisations who protect our marine environment. (It resonates with me, too, as I am a water sign!)

Sky Sun Sea Hessonite Garnet and Sterling Silver Pendant

As her zodiac sign is Aquarius, for which the stone is garnet, this hessonite garnet was perfect! Hessonite garnet is a variety of grossular garnet, with a lovely glowing orange hue. It is sometimes known as cinnamon stone.

Sky Sun Sea Hessonite Garnet and Sterling Silver Pendant

I’m really thrilled to have created this pendant, and I’m working on a new range with a similar feel! Thanks so much for the inspiration, Chris!